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Reaction: 42% of respondents in a study had heavier menstruation after the covid vaccine

Results from a survey of more than 39,000 menstruating individuals reveal that 42% experienced heavier bleeding after SARS-CoV-2 vaccination. Among the most likely groups were pre-menopausal women, Hispanic or Latina women, those who had been pregnant, and those with conditions such as endometriosis and polycystic ovary syndrome.

15/07/2022 - 20:00 CEST
 
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Expert reactions

Ana Rodríguez y Cristina Carrasco - menstruación vacuna covid 42%

Ana Beatriz Rodríguez Moratinos

Professor of Physiology at the University of Extremadura (UEx), Neuroimmunophysiology and Chrononutrition group.

Cristina Carrasco

Substitute lecturer and researcher at the Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences of the University of Extremadura

Science Media Centre Spain

When the rumour of menstrual cycle alterations after receiving the covid-19 vaccine became a global social media buzz, researchers such as the US researchers Dr Lee and Dr Clancy took an important scientific step in the pandemic by launching an observational study to dispel doubts about a phenomenon they themselves had experienced.

This research sheds light on a phenomenon that was initially rejected by society and whose scientific evidence will be enriched in the coming months with the publication of other similar studies

More than a year later, one of the pioneering studies on the subject and with the largest number of participants to date (more than 39,000, including women and gender-diverse people) is published, confirming that 42% of menstruating people experienced an increase in menstrual flow after vaccination. It also describes for the first time the occurrence of spontaneous bleeding in a high percentage of non-menstruating individuals, either due to menopause or due to contraceptive and transgender hormonal treatments, following inoculation with the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. The data obtained indicate that these alterations would be temporary and that age, systemic side effects associated with the vaccine (fever and/or fatigue), history of pregnancy and childbirth, and ethnicity, among others, would be significant factors influencing their appearance.

In this way, this research sheds light on a phenomenon that was initially rejected by society in general and whose scientific evidence will be enriched in the coming months with the publication of other similar studies, including those carried out in countries with high population vaccination rates, such as Spain. As the authors themselves indicate, and given the scarce previous data available, this and other vaccines have not been considered as a stressor with a potential impact on the menstrual cycle, which once again highlights the constant oblivion and consequent lack of knowledge that we continue to have about an aspect of vital importance in women's health.

In no case should such research fuel anti-vaccine theories, but rather serve to confirm the need for this and other side effects to no longer be overlooked in the conduct of clinical trials

While menstrual disturbances are not uncommon and dangerous, the evidence provided by this and other studies will, in the future, help to elucidate the inflammatory, and dare we say oxidative, mechanisms underlying this emerging phenomenon. In our view, such research should in no way fuel anti-vaccine theories, but rather serve to confirm the need for this and other side effects to no longer be overlooked in the conduct of clinical trials. Furthermore, such evidence will provide health professionals with a greater ability to assess their patients with scientifically validated information

The author has not responded to our request to declare conflicts of interest
EN
Publications
Investigating trends in those who experience menstrual bleeding changes after SARS-CoV-2 vaccination
  • Artículo de investigación
  • Encuesta
  • Revisado por pares
  • Estudio observacional
  • Humanos
Journal
Science Advances
Study types:
  • Artículo de investigación
  • Encuesta
  • Revisado por pares
  • Estudio observacional
  • Humanos
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