What we know

What we know

What we know

The SMC team produces explanatory articles on topical issues to answer society’s questions, with the necessary context and depth.

The rise of 'Streptococcus pyogenes' cases in the UK: can it happen in Spain?

The UK Health Safety Agency (UKHSA) has detected an unusual increase in Streptococcus pyogenes infections in the last month. This bacterium is responsible for mild infections, but also for more serious conditions such as scarlet fever and, above all, invasive disease. The British authorities have raised the alarm after at least eight children died from this pathogen. In Spain, the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases has reported that there have also been some deaths and is analysing whether there has been an unusual increase in cases.

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What we know about the first case of H5N1 avian influenza in humans detected in Spain

The National Microbiology Centre has confirmed the first positive human case of H5N1 avian influenza detected in Spain, Animal's Health said yesterday. This is the worker of a poultry farm located in the province of Guadalajara who remained asymptomatic and isolated until he tested negative. This is the second case detected in Europe after the UK declared its case in January this year.

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Why the United States and Europe have approved different vaccines against Omicron

Regulatory agencies in the US and Europe - the FDA and the EMA - have licensed vaccination against Omicron focusing on different variants and sub-variants. Different procedures and studies in humans and animals have informed the agencies' decisions. Experts hope that these new doses will provide sufficient protection this autumn and winter to mitigate the impact of the next wave.

What we know about the decision to change the mode of administration of the smallpox vaccine to allow more people to be vaccinated

The European Medicines Agency (EMA) has authorised the administration of monkeypox vaccine intradermally rather than subcutaneously. This will allow more people to be vaccinated in the absence of doses, but effectiveness and safety data are limited. The Public Health Commission has decided to follow this strategy except for pregnant women and immunocompromised persons. 

What is the status of Hipra's Spanish anticovid vaccine?

The European Medicines Agency (EMA) is still considering the approval of Hipra's SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. In mid-May, Hipra said it was ready to "have the vaccine available in a few days" following EMA approval, which it expected by the middle of this year, but which is being delayed until at least after July, as Elia Torroella, Hipra's R&D and Registration Director, explained at a breakfast briefing organised by the company today.