cancer

cancer

cancer

Reaction to study finding increased cancer risk in men with fertility problems and their family members

US research has analysed data from more than 300,000 people and found that both men with fertility problems and their family members have an increased risk of developing various types of cancer and at an earlier age. The results are published in the journal Human Reproduction.

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Reactions: New generation of T-cells against myeloma more effective in the lab than traditional CAR-Ts

A multidisciplinary study involving several Spanish research groups has preclinically tested a new type of immunotherapy for multiple myeloma. Instead of modifying T cells to attack the tumour directly, as CAR-T cells do, they have managed to make them secrete bispecific antibodies, which bind to the tumour on one side and to other T cells on the other, attracting them to the tumour. According to the authors, this cell therapy was more effective than traditional CAR-Ts and could generate less resistance. The results are published in the journal Science Translational Medicine. 

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Reactions: WHO estimates 35 million new cancer cases worldwide by 2050

By 2050, there will be more than 35 million new cases of cancer worldwide, an increase of 77% from the 20 million cases reported in 2022. These are projections made by the WHO's International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), which has published the latest estimates of the global burden of cancer. Using data from 185 countries, IARC estimates that in 2022 lung cancer was the most common cancer worldwide, with female breast cancer in second place, followed by colorectal, prostate and stomach cancer. The authors stress the urgent need to address inequalities around these diseases.

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Reaction: Colorectal cancer death rates among 25-49 year olds in the EU to rise by 2024

International research estimates that by 2024 there will be approximately 1,270,800 deaths from different types of cancer in the European Union (EU) as a whole. In the specific case of colorectal cancer, the researchers estimate that mortality rates will increase among people aged between 25 and 49 in the EU. In Spain, the increase will be 5.5 % in men. The authors of the research, published in the Annals of Oncology, attribute this increased mortality to overweight, obesity and alcohol consumption in this age group.

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Reactions: Psilocybin-assisted group therapy reduces depression symptoms in cancer patients

A dose of psilocybin—a hallucinogenic substance—administered to groups of 3 or 4 people suffering from cancer and depression may help reduce their depressive symptoms, according to a clinical trial conducted in the United States. The study involved 30 patients who also received individual and group therapeutic support. In another article, also published in the journal Cancer, the authors examine how the study participants perceived the therapy.

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Reaction: FDA launches investigation into possible increased risk of developing certain tumours with CAR-T therapies

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a statement reporting that it has received reports of T-cell tumours in patients who received various CAR-T cell treatments. As quoted in the statement, "although the overall benefits of these products continue to outweigh their potential risks for their approved uses, FDA is investigating the identified risk of T cell malignancy with serious outcomes, including hospitalization and death, and is evaluating the need for regulatory action".

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Reaction: Beef and dairy products have nutrients that enhance the immune response to cancer

A fatty acid present in the meat and dairy products of grazing animals, such as cows and sheep – trans-vaccenic acid (TVA) – enhances the ability of CD8+ T cells to infiltrate tumors and eliminate cancer cells, according to a new study conducted by researchers from the University of Chicago (USA), published today in the journal Nature.

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Reactions: study shows association between undergoing CT scan as a young person and increased cancer risk

An international study involving ISGlobal in Barcelona has studied almost one million people and concludes that having a CT scan before the age of 22 increases the risk of developing blood tumours in later years by 16%. According to the authors, who publish the results in the journal Nature Medicine, "in terms of absolute risk this means that, for every 10,000 young people who undergo a CT scan, we can expect to see around 1-2 cases of cancer in the 2-12 years following the examination.

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