diabetes

diabetes

diabetes

Reaction: Weight loss alone has little effect on diabetes control, study finds

Researchers at the University of Hong Kong have analysed data from more than 37,000 patients with type 2 diabetes followed for several years. Although some clinical trials have shown that weight loss can be quite effective in controlling the disease, the study data indicate that in the long term and 'in the real world' this is only achieved in 6% of patients. The results are published in the journal Plos Medicine.

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Reaction: Study associates early menstruation with increased risk of diabetes and stroke in adulthood

An early first menstrual period (menarche) - compared with the average of 13 years - is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in women under the age of 65 and also with an increased risk of stroke among those living with diabetes, says a study published in BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health. The research analyses data from a national health survey in the US, focusing on women aged 20-65 between 1999 and 2018.

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Reaction: more than 1.3 billion people will be living with diabetes by 2050, a figure accelerated by inequality

If effective strategies are not developed, more than 1.3 billion people will be living with diabetes by 2050, some 800 million more than today. This is according to the lead study in a set of papers published in The Lancet and The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology. In addition, 75% of these people will live in low- and middle-income countries, which is largely due to "structural racism and inequality", according to the editorial accompanying the studies.

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Reaction: Genetic study shows high levels of caffeine in blood could reduce body fat and risk of type 2 diabetes

Previous research has shown that coffee drinking is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease, but most are short-term, observational studies - they describe associations without being able to determine cause and effect. Research published in BMJ Medicine uses another method (Mendelian randomisation) to study potential causal relationships between caffeine levels in plasma and cardiovascular health, using genetic variants in nearly 10,000 people who participated in long-term studies. Higher genetically-predicted caffeine concentrations in plasma were associated with lower body-mass index and fat mass and a lower risk of type 2 diabetes. In addition, the research shows that 43% of the protective effect of caffeine on the risk of type 2 diabetes was influenced by a reduction in body mass index.

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