adolescence

adolescence

adolescence

Reaction: higher amount of metals detected in urine of adolescents who are frequent e-cigarette users

Teenagers who are frequent users of electronic cigarettes have more uranium and lead in their urine than occasional users, according to a study. Those who use sweet flavored products also have higher uranium levels in their urine than those who use mint flavors. The study, published in the journal Tobacco Control, analyses data from a representative sample of adolescents aged 13 to 17 in the United States, which includes 200 exclusive users of these e-cigarettes. 

0

Reactions: two reviews highlight lack of evidence on the use of puberty blockers and hormone treatments in young people

Two systematic reviews published in the Archives of Disease in Childhood warn of the lack of scientific evidence available on the use of puberty blockers and hormones for adolescents with gender-related disorders. In total, both reviews analyse a hundred published studies.

0

Reaction: Adolescents and children from low socioeconomic neighborhoods walk less and engage in less physical activity

A study published in the journal PLOS ONE, which includes data from over 3,000 Spanish adolescents and children, has shown that those living in more walkable areas report spending more minutes per day engaging in active transportation compared to those from less walkable neighborhoods. Along those lines, the lowest average minutes spent playing outdoors are observed among participants from neighborhoods with lower socioeconomic status and less walkability. The research is part of the PASOS study, coordinated by the Gasol Foundation.

0

Neighbourhoods with no space to play, walk or play sport: how the postcode affects children and young people's health

Research involving more than 3,000 adolescents and children from all Spanish autonomous communities concludes that those living in less walkable neighbourhoods with lower socioeconomic status walk less and engage in less physical activity at weekends than those living in more walkable areas with higher socioeconomic status. The paper, published in the journal PLOS ONE and part of the PASOS study, was presented by two of its authors at a briefing organised by SMC Spain. 

0

Reactions: Study says smaller classrooms do not improve grades for children from low-income families

Smaller classroom sizes in schools are failing to increase the resilience of children from low-income families, according to a study published in the International Journal of Science Education. Data from more than 2,700 disadvantaged secondary school students in Japan and China show that minimising class sizes does not lead to better grades. The authors of the study claim that reducing classroom size may even decrease the likelihood of children achieving the best results.

0

Reactions: how to make cities that care for young people's mental health

Access to safe public spaces to meet, employment, education and public health are some of the main measures recommended to make cities more friendly to the mental health of young people and adolescents. The analysis, based on surveys of 518 people in several countries, is published in the journal Nature and is intended to serve as a guide for urban planning policies that reduce inequalities and take into account the needs of young people.

0

Children of people with mental disorders are more at risk of developing the same or other disorders

The largest meta-analysis to date that studies the risk of children of people with a mental disorder also suffering from some type of mental disorder during their lifetime has been published, with Spanish participation. According to the study, the risk is more than double that of the rest of the population. To explain the study and resolve any doubts that may arise, the Science Media Centre Spain organised an information session with one of the authors, psychiatrist Joaquim Raduà.

0

Reaction: Study questions whether digital leisure reading improves reading comprehension in younger students

A meta-analysis by the University of Valencia has studied the links between leisure reading habits on digital devices and the reading comprehension of students of different ages. The research - which is based on 25 studies published between 2000 and 2022 involving some 470,000 students from different countries - concludes that in the early stages (primary and 1st and 2nd ESO in the Spanish case) there were small negative relationships between digital leisure reading and reading comprehension, while in later stages (3rd and 4th ESO, baccalaureate and university) the relationship became slightly positive. The research is published in Review of Educational Research.

0

Reaction: Social media use in young people is associated with increased risk behaviour, says review of studies

A review including 126 studies shows an association between the use of social networking sites by 10-19 year olds and increased risk behaviours, including alcohol, tobacco and other drug use, risky sexual behaviour, gambling and antisocial behaviour. According to the authors, who acknowledge that their research does not establish causality, "precautions may need to be taken in academia, government, health and education before the risks of adolescent use of social networking sites are fully understood". The findings are published in The BMJ.

0