Journalists

Journalists

Covering current events in science, the environment, technology and health requires a context and reliable sources that respond quickly.

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When science hits the headlines, we publish reactions, explanations, and in-depth analysis from reliable sources, capturing both the evidence and the debates. Our library of science journalism resources and the briefings may be of use to you. Consult our directory of research centres.

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We are on the lookout for any controversial information about science (embargoed or not), in order to react with the agility the media needs. Sign up to receive our embargoed contents, all under the Creative Commons licence. Find out more about how we work here.

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Reactions: Confirmed case of swine flu in a worker on a farm in Catalonia

The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) reported that on January 29th, Spanish authorities notified a possible case of human infection with swine flu virus A(H1N1)v in a worker from a Catalan pig farm. After being diagnosed with bronchitis, subsequent laboratory analyses confirmed it as swine flu A(H1N1)v. The ECDC informs that the patient has fully recovered, and to date, no new cases have been detected among close contacts or among the worker's colleagues at the farm.

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Reactions: Pollution aggravates water scarcity problem

In 2010, nearly 1,000 sub-basins around the world were facing water shortages. But when considering not only water quantity, but also water quality, this figure rises to more than 2,500, according to a study published in Nature Communications. By 2050, the authors estimate that up to a third of sub-basins will face severe shortages of clean water, which could affect 3 billion people. Southern China, Europe, North America and Africa will be the most affected regions.

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Reactions: skeletons of marine sponges suggest that global temperature has already exceeded the 1.5°C limit

Global average surface temperatures may have already surpassed the 1.5°C warming mark and could exceed 2°C by the end of the decade, as suggested by an article published in Nature Climate Change. The projections are based on 300 years of preserved ocean temperature records found in Caribbean sponge skeletons.

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Reactions to the results of the phase 3 malaria vaccine R21 trial

In a clinical trial of nearly 5,000 children aged 5-36 months, a new malaria vaccine - called R21/MatrixM - reduced symptomatic cases by 68-75% over the following year. According to the authors, the vaccine will be inexpensive and could contribute to a substantial reduction in malaria suffering and deaths in sub-Saharan Africa. The results of the phase 3 trial are published in The Lancet.

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Reactions: WHO estimates 35 million new cancer cases worldwide by 2050

By 2050, there will be more than 35 million new cases of cancer worldwide, an increase of 77% from the 20 million cases reported in 2022. These are projections made by the WHO's International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), which has published the latest estimates of the global burden of cancer. Using data from 185 countries, IARC estimates that in 2022 lung cancer was the most common cancer worldwide, with female breast cancer in second place, followed by colorectal, prostate and stomach cancer. The authors stress the urgent need to address inequalities around these diseases.

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Reactions: 38% of dog owners say they give cannabinoids to their dogs, according to Danish survey

In an anonymous online survey of dog owners in Denmark, 38% of respondents said they administered cannabinoid products - such as cannabidiol drops - to their pets without a prescription, even though their use is not legal in animals. Reasons given included pain, behavioural problems and allergies in their dogs. Some 2,000 people responded to the survey, the results of which are published in the journal PLoS ONE.

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Reactions: five cases of Alzheimer's described that may have been transmitted by growth hormone treatments from cadavers

Researchers have described five cases of people in the UK who developed Alzheimer's-like dementia after being treated as children with growth hormone from cadavers. The treatment was administered between 60 and 40 years ago. This suggests that the disease could be transmitted. However, the authors point out that this is a very rare occurrence and could have been caused by repeated exposure to a type of hormone that is no longer used. The results are published in the journal Nature Medicine.

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Reaction: Colorectal cancer death rates among 25-49 year olds in the EU to rise by 2024

International research estimates that by 2024 there will be approximately 1,270,800 deaths from different types of cancer in the European Union (EU) as a whole. In the specific case of colorectal cancer, the researchers estimate that mortality rates will increase among people aged between 25 and 49 in the EU. In Spain, the increase will be 5.5 % in men. The authors of the research, published in the Annals of Oncology, attribute this increased mortality to overweight, obesity and alcohol consumption in this age group.

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Reactions: study links heavy metals to ovarian ageing

Heavy metals - including arsenic, cadmium and mercury - may adversely affect the ovaries of women approaching menopause, a study claims. Those with high levels of metals in their urine had lower levels of anti-Müllerian hormone, indicating diminished ovarian reserve - fewer oocytes in the ovaries compared to other women of that age. The authors, whose study is published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, used urine data from more than 500 women in the US up to 10 years before their last menstrual period.

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Reaction: researchers study indicators that can predict a migraine using data from an app

US researchers have analysed data from 477 people who, using a mobile app, recorded their moods, energy levels and migraine occurrence four times a day for two weeks. Morning attacks were associated with poorer self-rated sleep quality and less energy the day before. Stress and high-energy states were linked to headaches in the afternoon, adds the study, which is published in the journal Neurology.

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