Journalists

Journalists

Covering current events in science, the environment, technology and health requires a context and reliable sources that respond quickly.

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When science hits the headlines, we publish reactions, explanations, and in-depth analysis from reliable sources, capturing both the evidence and the debates. Our library of science journalism resources and the briefings may be of use to you. Consult our directory of research centres.

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We are on the lookout for any controversial information about science (embargoed or not), in order to react with the agility the media needs. Sign up to receive our embargoed contents, all under the Creative Commons licence. Find out more about how we work here.

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Prenatal exposure to a mixture of endocrine disruptors is associated with poorer metabolic health in childhood

A study conducted in Spain and five other European countries shows that exposure to mixtures of endocrine disruptors during pregnancy is associated with metabolic health problems in children. The research, published in JAMA Network Open, followed more than 1,100 mother-child pairs between 2003 and 2016 and found a correlation between measures of metabolic dysfunction in children aged 6-11 years, and their prenatal exposure to chemicals such as metals or organochlorine pesticides, among others. According to the authors, these results could be related to the current increase in metabolic syndrome across the lifespan, which results in an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. 

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Study analyses the causes behind summer hospitalisations in Spain over more than a decade

Research led by ISGlobal has analysed more than 11 million hospital admissions in 48 Spanish provinces during the months of June to September between 2006 and 2019. The results, published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives, show that high temperatures increase admissions for obesity-related issues and renal and urinary insufficiency, among other causes. 

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Heat and health: what the data on 11 million summer hospitalisations in Spain reveals

A study published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives has analysed hospital admissions in 48 Spanish provinces during the months of June to September between 2006 and 2019. Its results, discussed at a briefing organised by Science Media Centre Spain, show that high temperatures increase admissions for issues related to obesity and renal and urinary insufficiency, among other causes. 

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More frequent nightmares may precede some autoimmune diseases

An increased frequency of nightmares and hallucinations may precede the onset of certain autoimmune diseases such as lupus, says a study published in the journal eClinicalMedicine. The team surveyed 676 people with lupus and 400 physicians, as well as in-depth interviews with a smaller group. Of the patients who experienced hallucinations, 61% of those with lupus and 34% of those with other rheumatic autoimmune diseases reported having more disturbing nightmares before the hallucinations. Paying more attention to these neuropsychiatric symptoms could provide an ‘early warning system’ for earlier clinical intervention, say the authors.  

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Non-invasive electrostimulation device improves arm and hand function in quadriplegic patients

A clinical trial involving 60 people with upper and lower body paralysis showed that a non-invasive electrical spinal cord stimulation device - called ARCEX - helps improve hand and arm function in quadriplegic patients. The study, the results of which are published in Nature Medicine, showed that 43 of the people with paralysis experienced improved arm and hand strength and function after receiving electrical stimulation along with rehabilitation exercises.  

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Further progress towards an effective HIV vaccine through a sequential approach

The Science group is simultaneously publishing four papers (two in the journal Science, one in Science Immunology and one in Science Translational Medicine) that include advances in a sequential vaccination strategy for an effective HIV vaccine. The methods employed aim to obtain broad-spectrum neutralising antibodies and one of the proposals is already in clinical trials. 

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New cell type promotes parental care in mice

A research team has discovered a type of cell that appears to be linked to parental care in Oldfield mice, a monogamous species. These cells are not present in Deer mice, other rodents of the same genus that engage in promiscuous behaviour. The results "provide an example by which the recent evolution of a new cell type in a gland outside the brain contributes to the evolution of social behaviour," the authors conclude in their paper, published in Nature

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Quantum Internet developed using fibre optics from a Boston area

A team of physicists led by Harvard University (USA) has succeeded in linking two quantum memory nodes 35 kilometres apart using existing fibre optics in the Boston area (USA). This is the longest distance achieved to date. According to the authors, who publish their results in the journal Nature, ‘demonstrating that quantum network nodes can intertwine in the real-world environment of a busy urban area is an important step towards practical networking between quantum computers’. 

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